Resources: 200hr Yoga Teacher Training

Get Started

Book: Training Manual Book: Yogasana Photobook Book: Functional Anatomy of Yoga Presentation Slide: Technique Training (iRyne) Presentation Slide: Theory (R2) References & Books Audio ...
Read More
IRYNE YOGAVATAR iRyne Yogavatar is a new age yogini and she is the founder of Yogavatar® New Age Yoga School and co-founder of iSpirit Asia; where she direct 200-hour Yoga Alliance recognise teacher training programs under her belt as a E-RYT500 and a Yoga Alliance Continuing Education provider. She is a certified Yoga Therapist recognised by the Ministry of Education Malaysia. iRyne has a lifelong interest in health and wellness. Yoga has been a central focus of her life since 2004. She has immersed herself in many styles of alignment-based and heart-centered yoga. She is known for her creative and ...
Read More
Dear YOGAVATAR® New Age Yogis and Yogini, I am inspired to offer you the YOGAVATAR® 200-hour Teacher Training Course, which is enriching and transformational. Whether you desire to deepen the understanding your yoga practice and/or aspire to teach, this Course provides invaluable resources of the ancient tradition for self-transformation and the evolutionary path of New Age Yoga. To gain this benefit it is essential that you have a dedicated and resolute commitment to yourself. We trust that you have the willingness, health and strength to commit 100% to this Course. With that aim, I welcome you to this beautiful journey ...
Read More
the divine in me bows to the divine in you • respect and gratitude Namaste is derived from the Sanskrit nama, meaning "bow," and te, meaning "to you." A common salutation and valediction in the Hindu culture, namaste literally means, "I bow to you." On a more profound level, namaste signifies one soul recognizing and honoring the holiness of another. The salutation is often offered by yoga instructors at the beginning or conclusion of a class. In this sense, namaste is invoked to acknowledge the spiritual connection, or oneness, achieved by souls experiencing the practice of yoga together. The significance of the word ...
Read More
YTTC Day-01 YTTC Day-02 YTTC Day-03 YTTC Day-04 YTTC Day-05 YTTC Day-06 YTTC Day-07 YTTC Day-08 YTTC Day-09 YTTC Day-10 YTTC Day-11 YTTC Day-12 YTTC Day-13 YTTC Day-14 YTTC Day-15 YTTC Day-16 YTTC Day-17 YTTC Day-20 ...
Read More
YTTC Technique Day-01 YTTC Technique Day-02 YTTC Technique Day-03 YTTC Technique Day-04 YTTC Technique Day-05 YTTC Technique Day-06 YTTC Technique Day-08 YTTC Technique Day-09 YTTC Technique Day-10 YTTC Technique Day-11 YTTC Technique Day-12 YTTC Technique Day-13 YTTC Technique Day-14 YTTC Technique Day-15 YTTC Technique Day-16 YTTC Technique Day-17 ...
Read More

Chapter-01: Yoga Humanities

Yoga is not an ancient myth buried in oblivion. It is the most valuable inheritance of the present. It is the essential need of today and the culture of tomorrow. Yoga is the science of right living and, as such, is intend to be incorporated in daily life. It works on all aspects of the person: the physical, vital, mental, emotional, psychic and spiritual. The word yoga means 'unity' or 'oneness' and is derived from the Sanskrit word yuj which means 'to join'. This unity or joining is described in spiritual terms as the union of the individual consciousness with ...
Read More
The yoga we know today was developed as a part of the tantric civilization which existed in India and all parts of the world more than ten thousand years ago. In archaeological excavations made in the Indus Valley at Harappa and Mohenjodaro, now in modem Pakistan, many statues have been found depicting deities resembling Lord Shiva and Shakti (in the form of Parvati) performing various asanas and practising meditation. These ruins were once the dwelling place of people who lived in the pre-vedic age before the Aryan civilization started to flourish in the Indus subcontinent. According to mythical tradition, Shiva ...
Read More
In modern society, yoga has become synonymous with taking classes, doing poses, and sweating. The physical practice of yoga postures, however, which is known as hatha yoga, is just a small window into the larger world of yoga—it just happens to be the window through which most of us were introduced to it. But what if you aren’t that into physical exercise? You can still love yoga. In fact, some of the most devoted yogis I know don’t have a hatha yoga practice. In the same way, you don’t have to be devotedly spiritual to enjoy yoga and its benefits ...
Read More
The Yoga Sūtras of Patañjali are a collection of 196 Indian sutras (aphorisms) on the theory and practice of yoga. The Yoga Sutras were compiled prior to 400 CE by Patanjali who synthesized and organized knowledge about yoga from older traditions. The Yoga Sūtras of Patañjali was the most translated ancient Indian text in the medieval era, having been translated into about forty Indian languages and two non-Indian languages: Old Javanese and Arabic. The text fell into relative obscurity for nearly 700 years from the 12th to 19th century, and made a comeback in late 19th century due to the ...
Read More
In Patanjali's Yoga Sutra, the eightfold path is called ashtanga, which literally means "eight limbs" (ashta=eight, anga=limb). These eight steps basically act as guidelines on how to live a meaningful and purposeful life. They serve as a prescription for moral and ethical conduct and self-discipline; they direct attention toward one's health; and they help us to acknowledge the spiritual aspects of our nature. 1. Yama (attitudes toward our environment): The first limb, yama, deals with one's ethical standards and sense of integrity, focusing on our behavior and how we conduct ourselves in life. Yamas are universal practices that relate best ...
Read More
The Hatha Yoga Pradipika is a medieval scripture written in 1350. The Nath Yogi Swatmarama is the author. The meaning of the title is interesting to consider if one wishes to begin to understand the book’s content. Pradipika means “light” or “to illuminate”, ha means “sun”, tha means “moon” and yoga or yug means to “join”. So the title suggests: light on how to join the sun and the moon, or another way we could say this would be: The low-down on how to go beyond all limitations posed by living in a mundane reality where Nature and Spirit are ...
Read More
Today, in the 21st century, a spiritual heritage is being reclaimed of which yoga is very much a part. While yoga's central theme remains the highest goal of the spiritual path, yogic practices give direct and tangible benefits to everyone regardless of their spiritual aims. Physical and mental cleansing and strengthening is one of yoga's most important achievements. What makes it so powerful and effective is the fact that it works on the holistic principles of harmony and unification. According to medical scientists, yoga therapy is successful because of the balance created in the nervous and endocrine systems which directly ...
Read More
Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga A repetitive vinyasa class, extremely strenuous and athletic. This system consists of 6 sets, standardised asana sequences. There is no music, but the sound of Ujjayi breathing usually fills the room with a meditative quality. Mysore style Ashtanga classes are very different from regular yoga classes in that each student, having learned the standard sequence, flows through it at their own pace while the teacher moves around the room giving personal adjustments and directions. K. Pattabhi Jois is the author of the Ashtanga Yoga method. Iyengar Yoga The Iyengar method could be called minimalist yoga. It’s all ...
Read More
Each time we move into a yoga pose or practice some pranayama we deepen our ability to control our body, breath, and focus. Likewise, when we dig deeper into the philosophy of yoga, we naturally begin to eat, sleep, love, and think more like yogis. If you have been yearning for practical ways to incorporate all the branches of yoga into your daily life, it might be time for you to discover how to live a yogic lifestyle. What is a Yogic Lifestyle? A yogic lifestyle involves consciously shaping our attitudes, habits, and general ways of life to be more ...
Read More
20-Hour Yoga History and Philosophy Online Course ...
Read More

Chapter-02: Psychic Physiology

According to yogic physiology, the human framework is comprised of five bodies or sheaths, which account for the different aspects or dimensions of human existence. These five sheaths are known as: 1. Annamaya kosha, the food or material body 2. Pranamaya kosha, the bioplasmic or vital energy body 3. Manomaya kosha, the mental body 4. Vijnanamaya kosha, the psychic or higher mental body 5. Anandamaya kosha, the transcendental or bliss body. Annamaya kosha This is the sheath of the physical self, named from the fact that it is nourished by food. Living through this layer humans identify themselves with a ...
Read More
The pranamaya kosha is made up of five major pranas which are collectively known as the pancha, or five, pranas: prana, apana, samana, udana and vyana. Prana in this context does not refer to cosmic prana but rather to just one part of the pranamaya kosha, governing the area between the larynx and the top of the diaphragm. It is associated with the organs of respiration and speech, and the gullet, together with the muscles and nerves that activate them. It is the force by which the breath is drawn inside. Apana is located below the navel region and provides ...
Read More
The word nadi literally means 'flow' or 'current'. The ancient texts say that there are seventy-two thousand nadis in the psychic body. These are visible as currents of light to a person who has developed psychic vision. In recent times the word nadi has been translated as 'nerve', but actually nadis are blueprints for physical manifestation. Like the chakras, they are not actually part of the physical body, although they correspond with the nerves. N a dis are the subtle channels through which the pranic forces flow. Out of the large number of nadis in the psychic body, ten are ...
Read More
The word chakra literally means 'wheel' or 'circle', but in the yogic context a better translation is 'vortex' or 'whirlpool'. The chakras are vortices of pranic energy at specific areas in the body which control the circulation of prana permeating the entire human structure. Each chakra is a switch which turns on or opens up patterns of behaviour, thought or emotional reactions which may have been unconscious in our everyday life. They relate to specific areas of the brain, and in most people these psychic centres lie dormant and inactive. Concentration on the chakras while performing yogic practices stimulates the ...
Read More
The ancient teachings of yoga, like the Samkhya Philosophy and also the Bhagavad Gita, talk about three essential aspects of nature. These are called the Gunas. Gunas in Sanskrit means a strand or a rope. All of creation (Prakriti or universal nature) is made up of these three qualities called: Tamas Tamas which manifests as darkness, inertia, lethargy, dullness, illusion, heaviness. Tamas can be seen as the past, your lot in life, the given. Rajas Rajas which manifests as the energy of passion, emotion, desire, activity, sorrow. Rajas can be seen as the future, desire, externalization. Sattva Sattva which is ...
Read More
Ayurveda, which translates as "knowledge of life," dates back 5,000 years to the ancient Sanskrit texts, the Vedas. It's a system of healing that examines physical constitution, emotional nature, and spiritual outlook in the context of the universe. According to the philosophy, universal life force manifests as three different energies, or doshas, known as vata, pitta, and kapha. We're all made up of a unique combination of these three forces. Though everyone has some of each, most people tend to have an abundance of one or two of the doshas. This unique combination is determined at the moment of conception, ...
Read More

Chapter-03: Anatomy & Physiology

Human anatomy and physiology is a vast subject, as is the art of Hatha Yoga. Nevertheless, combining knowledge from both fields is extremely beneficial to the Yoga practitioner. Athletes can improve their performance and experience fewer injuries through a basic understanding of their musculoskeletal system. Similarly, Yoga practitioners can benefit from the application of Western science to their practice development. It is not necessary to memorize hundreds of muscles and bones to experience the benefits of applying science to Yoga. What is necessary is the functional understanding of a manageable number of key anatomic structures, in their settings, as they ...
Read More

Chapter-04: Shatkarma

Hatha yoga, as described in the early Yoga Upanishads, was made up of the shatkarmas and is a very precise and systematic science. Shot means 'six' and karma means 'action'; the shatkarmas consist of six groups of purification practices. The aim of hatha yoga and, therefore, of the shatkarmas is to create harmony between the two major pranic flows, ida and pingala, thereby attaining physical and mental purification and balance. The shatkarmas are also used to balance the three doshas or humours in the body: kapha, mucus; pitta, bile; and vata, wind. According to both ayurveda and hatha yoga, an ...
Read More
Preparation: A special neti lota, 'neti pot' should be used. The lota may be made of plastic, pottery, brass or any other metal which does not contaminate the water. The nozzle on the end of the spout should fit comfortably into the nostril so that the water does not leak out. Even a teapot may be used if the tip of the spout is not too large or sharp. The water should be at body temperature and thoroughly mixed with salt in the proportion of one teaspoonful per half liter of water. The addition of salt ensures the osmotic pressure ...
Read More
Preparation: This practice involves passing a length of cotton thread through the nose. Traditionally, a specially prepared cotton thread was used. Several strands were tightly wrapped together and dipped in melted beeswax. The width was about 4 mm and the length 36 to 45 cm. Nowadays, however, the practice is more conveniently performed by using a thin rubber catheter lubricated with butter or saliva so that it slides easily through the nasal passage. The size of the catheter depends on the individual nasal passage but sizes 4, 5 or 6 are generally suitable. Technique I: Basic practice Take any comfortable ...
Read More
Sit in bhadrasana with the big toes touching, or in padmasana. Inhale deeply. Exhale, emptying the lungs as much as possible. Lean fonvard slightly, straightening the elbows. Push down on the knees with the hands and perform jalandhara bandha. Contract and expand the abdominal muscles rapidly for as long as it is possible to hold the breath outside comfortably. Do not strain . Release jalandhara bandha. When the head is upright, take a slow, deep breath in. This is one round. Relax until the breathing normalizes before commencing the next round. Duration: Beginners may find this practice difficult and quickly ...
Read More
Uddiyana Bandha Nauli Stage I: Madhyama Nauli (Central Abdominal Contraction)  Stand with the feet about a meter apart. Take a deep breath in through the nose and then exhale through the mouth, emptying the lungs as much as possible. Bend the knees slightly and lean forward, placing the palms of the hands on the thighs just above the knees. The fingers may point either inward or outward. The weight of the upper body should rest comfortably on this area above the knees. The arms should remain straight. Perform jalandhara bandha while maintaining bahir kumbhaka, external breath retention. Keep the eyes ...
Read More
Technique I: Vatkrama Kapalbhati (air cleansing) This practice is the same as kapaibhati pranayama (see the section Pranayama). Technique 2: Vyutkrama Kapalbhati (sinus cleansing) Fill a bowl with warm water and add salt to the ratio of one teaspoon per half litre, ensuring the salt is well dissolved. Stand comfortably and bend over the bowl of water. Relax the whole body as much as possible in this position. Scoop the water up in the palm of the hand and sniff it in through the nostrils. Let the water flow down to the mouth and then spit it out. Practise in ...
Read More
Light the candle and place it on a small table so that the flame is exactly at eye level when sitting. Sit in any comfortable meditation asana with the head and spine erect. Adjust the position so that the candle is an arm's length away from the body. Close the eyes and relax the whole body, especially the eyes. Be aware of body steadiness for a few minutes. Keep the body absolutely still throughout the practice. Open the eyes and gaze steadily at the tip of the wick. The flame may flicker slightly but the tip of the wick will ...
Read More

Chapter-05: Preparatory

Set a Sankalpa or intention At the beginning of a yoga class, set a Sankalpa or intention for your practice. Sankalpa is a Sanskrit term in yogic philosophy that refers to a heartfelt desire, a solemn vow, an intention, or a resolve to do something. It is similar to the English concept of a resolution, except that it comes from even deeper within and tends to be an affirmation. Setting a Sankalpa is one way we can live a more mindful and intentional life. By setting an intention, we are starting to take our yoga "off the mat" and make ...
Read More
Anuloma Viloma Pranayama Anuloma viloma pranayama is a yogic breathing exercise that is a form of alternate nostril breathing designed to calm the body and mind. The term is sometimes used as a synonym for nadi shodhana, but the latter encompasses several different types of alternate breathing exercises. The name comes from the Sanskrit, anu, meaning “with”; vi, meaning “against” or “contrary to”; and loma, meaning “hair.” Anuloma, therefore, means “with the hair” or “with the grain,” and viloma means “against the natural course.” Pranayama comes from two Sanskrit words: prana, meaning "life force energy," and yama, meaning "control" – ...
Read More
In the present-day world, about 35% of the population suffers from myopia and hypermetropia in varying degrees. These disorders are usually overcome using powerful glasses and lenses which correct the refractive errors of the eye. However, one needs to understand that glasses never cure bad eyesight. In fact, using powerful glasses can worsen eye problems. Therefore, one should use glasses only when absolutely necessary. Other than a few diseases such as cataract and glaucoma which occur due to bacterial infections, many eye disorders are related to the malfunctioning of the ocular muscles caused by chronic mental and emotional tensions. Yoga ...
Read More
Pawanmuktasana Series The pawanmuktasana series is one of the most important series of practices that has a very profound effect on the human body and mind and is thus a most useful tool for the yogic management of various disorders and maintenance of health. Being the first practical series taught in hatha yoga, it is essential for laying a firm foundation in yogic life. Pawanmuktasana is valuable for understanding the meaning of asana by developing awareness of the body's movements and the subtle effects they have at the various levels of being. It is very useful as a preparatory practice ...
Read More
Forward & Backward Slowly move the head forward and try to touch the chin to the chest. Move the head as far back as comfortable. Do not strain. Try to feel the stretch of the muscles in the front and back of the neck, and the loosening of the vertebrae in the neck. Practice 10 rounds. Inhale on the backward movement. Exhale on the forward movement. Turn Right & Left Gently turn the head to the right so that the chin is in line with the shoulder. Feel the release of tension in the neck muscles and the loosening of ...
Read More
Forward & Backward Start on your hands and knees with your wrists directly under your shoulders, and your knees directly under your hips. Point your fingertips to the top of your mat. Place your shins and knees hip-width apart. Center your head in a neutral position and soften your gaze downward. Begin by moving into Cow Pose: Inhale as you drop your belly towards the mat. Lift your chin and chest, and gaze up toward the ceiling. Broaden across your shoulder blades and draw your shoulders away from your ears. Next, move into Cat Pose: As you exhale, draw your ...
Read More

Chapter-06: Asana

Sthiramsukhamaasanam In the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali there is a concise definition of yogasanas: "Sthiramsukhamaasanam", meaning 'that position which is comfortable and steady'. In this context, asanas are practised to develop the ability to sit comfortably in one position for an extended period of time, ability necessary for meditation. Raja yoga equates yogasana to the stable sitting position. The hatha yogis, however, found that certain specific body positions, asanas, open the energy channels and psychic centres. They found that developing control of the body through these practices enabled them to control the mind and energy. Yogasanas became tools to higher ...
Read More
The following practice notes should be thoroughly understood before going any further. Although anybody can practise asanas, they become more efficacious and beneficial when performed in the proper manner after correct preparation. Breathing: Always breathe through the nose unless specific instructions are given to the contrary. Try to coordinate the breath with the asana practice. Mind and awareness: This is as essential to the practice of asana as it is to all yoga practices. The purpose of asana practice is to influence, integrate and harmonise all the levels of being: physical, prank, mental, emotional, psychic and spiritual. At first it ...
Read More
The main purpose of the meditation asanas is to allow the practitioner to sit for extended periods of time without moving the body and without discomfort. Only when the body has been steady and still for some time will meditation be experienced. Deep meditation requires the spinal column to be straight and very few asanas can satisfy this condition. Furthermore, in high stages of meditation the practitioner loses control over the muscles of the body. The meditation asana, therefore, needs to hold the body in a steady position without conscious effort. Why not lie in shavasana, then, for meditation since ...
Read More
The Sanskrit name Surya here refers to the sun and Samaskara means 'salutations'. Surya Namaskara has been handed down from the enlightened sages of the Vedic Age. The sun symbolises spiritual consciousness and, in ancient times, was worshipped on a daily basis. In yoga the sun is represented by pingala or surya nadi, the pranic channel which carries the vital, lifegiving force. This dynamic group of asanas is not regarded as being a traditional part of hatha yoga practices as it was added to the original asana group at a later time. However, it is an effective way of loosening ...
Read More
Standing asanas connect us to the ground we walk on, Earth who supports us. Standing asanas give us the foundation upon which build our practice and combination of balance, strength, and flexibility we need to live our lives. With our feet planted firmly on the ground, we are free to rise up or bend to meet the challenges of daily life. Physiologically, standing asanas strengthen the leg muscles and joints, keep the spine flexible and long, open the heart, and increase blood circulation to the lower extremities ...
Read More
When you see yogis doing an arm balance with finesse, they look as light as a feather. They make the pose look so easy that you might forget how much strength it requires. But the inverse is actually true—to make a difficult pose look effortless, you need to be plenty strong. Yoga doesn't build brute force. It teaches you to cultivate a different type of strength: the strength that results from physical integration and connection. Physical integration is that sense of coordinating different parts of the body so that they work in concert. It's the idea that we become exponentially ...
Read More
To balance in the space between movement and stillness is to practice asana with complete present-moment focus. Physically, this group of asanas strengthen the arms and legs, promote equilibrium and stamina, and bring freedom to the breath. Their weight-bearing action stimulates the bones in the legs, arms, and spine. On a deeper level, this group of asanas teach us that a balanced body brings a steadier mind. By learning to stay balanced and focused in these poses, we bring that awareness into our everyday lives ...
Read More
Backward bending asanas are postures that turn the body out to face the world. They are stimulating and extroverting. Because they expand the chest and encourage inhalation, they are associated with the attitude of embracing life. They are also dynamic postures that move counter to gravity and, therefore, require strength and energy to perform. Some people are known to bend over backwards to please others and these people often have the same ability on the physical level. Those who have difficulty in bending backwards, may be frightened to face life and give of themselves with love. These common fears are ...
Read More
This is an important series of asanas for spinal health. Every asana programme should include at least one practice from this group, preferably following the forward and backward bending postures. The twist imposed on the spine and the whole trunk exercises the muscles, makes the spinal column more flexible and stimulates the spinal nerves. It also has a strong influence on the abdominal muscles, alternately stretching and compressing them as the body twists from one direction to the other. Beginners must be careful not to twist the trunk more than flexibility will allow. Most of the spinal twist asanas enhance ...
Read More
Generally speaking, forward bending is a passive process in which gravity is utilised to stretch the muscle groups being focused upon. While backward bends move the body away from the confines of gravity, forward bending asanas use gravity to help release tension and pain. It is a process of introversion, counteracting the extroversion and dynamic opening up of bending backwards. Forward bending, associated with chest compression and exhalation, induces relaxation. Many people lead sedentary lifestyles with little or no exercise and, as a result, the body becomes stiff and unable to bend forward. City living encourages mental tension and physical ...
Read More
Inverted asanas reverse the action of gravity on the body; instead of everything being pulled towards the feet, the orientation shifts towards the head. Similarly, on the emotional and psychic levels, inverted asanas turn everything upside down, throwing a new light on old patterns of behaviour and being. Generally, these practices improve health, reduce anxiety and stress, and increase self-confidence. They also increase mental power, concentration and the capacity to sustain large workloads without strain. Inverted asanas encourage a rich supply of blood to flow to the brain, nourishing the neurones and flushing out toxins. Blood and lymph, accumulated in ...
Read More

Chapter-07: Pranayama

Pranayama is generally defined as breath control. Although this interpretation may seem correct in view of the practices involved, it does not convey the full meaning of the term. The word pranayama is comprised of two roots: prana plus ayama. Prana means 'vital energy' or 'life force'. It is the force, which exists in all things, whether animate or inanimate. Although closely related to the air we breathe, it is subtler than air or oxygen. Therefore, pranayama should not be considered as mere breathing exercises aimed at introducing extra oxygen into the lungs. Pranayama utilises breathing to influence the flow ...
Read More
In the traditional texts, there are innumerable rules and regulations pertaining to pranayama. The main points are to exercise moderation, balance and common sense with regard to inner and outer thinking and living. However, for those who seriously wish to take up the advanced practices of pranayama, the guidance of a guru or experienced teacher is essential. Breathing: Always breathe through the nose and not the mouth unless specifically instructed otherwise. The nose should be cleaned regularly by jala neti prior to the practice session. Be aware of the nostrils throughout the techniques. While inhaling, the nostrils should dilate or ...
Read More
This is a simple technique, which introduces practitioners to their own respiratory system and breathing patterns. It is very relaxing and may be practised at any time. Awareness of the breathing process is itself sufficient to slow down the respiratory rate and establish a more relaxed rhythm. Instructions: Sit in a comfortable meditation posture or lie in shavasana and relax the whole body.Observe the natural and spontaneous breathing process. Develop total awareness of the rhythmic flow of the breath. Feel the breath flowing in and out of the nose. Do not control the breath in any way. Notice that the ...
Read More
Abdominal or diaphragmatic breathing is practised by enhancing the action of the diaphragm and minimising the action of the rib cage. The diaphragm is a domed sheet of muscle that separates the lungs from the abdominal cavity and, when functioning correctly, promotes the most efficient type of breathing. It is the effect of the diaphragm rather than the diaphragm itself that is experienced as the stomach rises and falls. Sensitivity to the muscle itself, however, will come with practice. During inhalation the diaphragm moves downward, pushing the abdominal contents downward and outward. During exhalation the diaphragm moves upward and the ...
Read More
Thoracic breathing utilises the middle lobes of the lungs by expanding and contracting the rib cage. It expends more energy than abdominal breathing for the same quantity of air exchange. It is often associated with physical exercise and exertion, as well as stress and tension, when it helps the body to obtain more oxygen. However, the tendency in many people is to continue this type of breathing long after the stressful situation has passed, creating bad breathing habits and continued tension. Instructions: Sit in a meditation posture or lie in shavasana and relax the whole body. Maintain unbroken awareness of ...
Read More
Clavicular breathing is the final stage of total rib cage expansion. It occurs after the thoracic inhalation has been completed. In order to absorb a little more air into the lungs, the upper ribs and the collarbone are pulled upwards by the muscles of the neck, throat and sternum. This requires maximum expansion on inhalation and only the upper lobes of the lungs are ventilated. In daily life, clavicular breathing is only used under conditions of extreme physical exertion and when experiencing obstructive airway diseases such as asthma. Instructions: Lie in shavasana and relax the whole body. Perform thoracic breathing ...
Read More
Yogic breathing combines the previous three techniques. It is used to maximise inhalation and exhalation. Its purpose is to gain control of the breath, correct poor breathing habits and increase oxygen intake. It may be practised at any time and is especially useful in situations of high stress or anger for calming the nerves. However, while its inclusion in a daily yoga programme will correct and deepen natural breathing patterns, yogic breathing itself should not be performed continually. Instructions: Sit in a meditation posture or lie in shavasana and relax the whole body. Inhale slowly and deeply, allowing the abdomen ...
Read More
Hand position: Nasagra Mudra (nosetip position) Hold the fingers of the right hand in front of the face. Rest the index and middle fingers gently on the eyebrow centre. Both fingers should be relaxed. The thumb is above the right nostril and the ring finger above the left. These two digits control the flow of breath in the nostrils by alternately pressing on one nostril, blocking the flow of breath, and then the other. The little finger is comfortably folded. When practising for long periods, the elbow may be supported by the left hand although care is needed to prevent ...
Read More
Sit in any comfortable meditation posture with the hands on the knees in chin or jnana mudra. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. Extend the tongue outside the mouth as far as possible without strain. Roll the sides of the tongue up so that it forms a tube. Inhale and draw the breath in through this tube. At the end of inhalation, draw the tongue in, close the mouth and exhale through the nose. Practice yogic breathing throughout. The breath should produce a noise similar to rushing wind. A feeling of icy coldness will be experienced on the ...
Read More
Sit in any comfortable meditation posture. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. Hold the teeth lightly together. Separate the lips, exposing the teeth. The tongue may be kept flat or folded against the soft palate in khechari mudra (refer to the section Mudra). Breathe in slowly and deeply through the teeth. At the end of the inhalation, close the mouth, keeping the tongue either flat or in khechari mudra. Breathe out slowly through the nose in a controlled manner. This is one round. Practice 9 rounds. Duration: As for sheetali pranayama. Awareness: On the hissing sound. Sequence: As ...
Read More
Sit in a comfortable meditation asana, preferably padmasana or siddha/siddha yoni asana with the hands resting on the knees in joana or chin mudra. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. The lips should remain gently closed with the teeth slightly separated throughout the practice. This allows the sound vibration to be heard and felt more distinctly. Raise the arms sideways and bend the elbows, bringing the hands to the ears. Use the index or middle finger to plug the ears or the flaps of the ears may be pressed without inserting the fingers. Bring the awareness to the ...
Read More
Sit in any comfortable position, preferably a meditation asana. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. Take the awareness to the breath in the nostrils and allow the breathing to become calm and rhythmic. After some time, transfer the awareness to the throat. Try to feel or to imagine that the breath is being drawn in and out through the throat and not through the nostrils; as if inhalation and exhalation are taking place through a small hole in the throat. As the breathing becomes slower and deeper, gently contract the glottis so that a soft snoring sound like ...
Read More
Technique 1: Preparatory practice:  Sit in any comfortable meditation posture, preferably padmasana, ardha padmasana or siddha/ siddha yoni asana, with the hands resting on the knees in either chin or jnana mudra. Keep the head and spine straight, close the eyes and relax the whole body. Take a deep breath in and breathe out forcefully through the nose. Do not strain. Immediately afterwards breathe in with the same force. During inhalation the diaphragm descends and the abdomen moves outward. During exhalation the diaphragm moves upward and the abdomen moves inward. The above movements should be slightly exaggerated. Continue in this ...
Read More
Sit in any comfortable meditation asana; padmasana, as a first choice, or siddha/siddha yoni asana, with the head and spine straight and the hands resting on the knees in either chin or jnana mudra. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. Inhale deeply through both nostrils, expanding the abdomen, and exhale with a forceful contraction of the abdominal muscles. Do not strain. The next inhalation takes place by passively allowing the abdominal muscles to expand. Inhalation should be spontaneous or passive recoil, involving no effort. Perform 10 respirations to begin with. Count each respiration mentally. After completing 10 rapid ...
Read More
Assume a comfortable meditation asana with the head and spine straight. Place the hands on the knees in either chin or jnana mudra. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. When the body is comfortable, still and relaxed, watch the breath for a few minutes until it spontaneously becomes slow and deep. Adopt nasagra mudra (see nadi shodhana pranayama). Close the left nostril with the ring finger and inhale slowly and deeply through the right nostril. At the end of inhalation close both nostrils, retain the breath and perform jalandhara and moola bandhas. Maintain for just a few seconds ...
Read More

Chapter-08: Pratyahara, Dharana, Dhyana

Overcoming Stress Most aspects of the average modern lifestyle are run at great speed. We tend to try to fit more and more into our lives, with heavier workloads, more demands on our time, greater distances to travel to our destinations, and higher expectations. Different people experience stress in different ways, and while stress symptoms can be clearly diagnosed, there is no common medical solution for them. There are, however, many possible ways of trying to deal with feelings of stress from doing sport, having a massage and taking nerve tonics to going on vacation, changing jobs or trying to ...
Read More
Lie flat on the back with the arms about 15 cm away from the body, palms facing upward. A thin pillow or folded cloth may be placed behind the head to prevent discomfort. Let the fingers curl up slightly. Move the feet slightly apart to a comfortable position and close the eyes. The head and spine should be in a straight line. Make sure the head does not fall to one side or the other. Relax the whole body and stop all physical movement. Become aware of the natural breath and allow it to become rhythmic and relaxed. Begin to ...
Read More
A Practice of 61-Points to Sharpen Concentration We are trained from birth to attend almost exclusively to the external world. Steeped in the concept of linear time and the law of cause and effect, we develop the habit of turning our minds outward and allowing our attention to be directed by our senses. So it is only natural that when we sit for meditation, our minds wander, drawn away by sense stimuli or by memories of past sensory experiences. Because meditation is the process of maintaining an unwavering, inward focus on an object, word, or physiological process such as breathing, ...
Read More
https://youtu.be/SFGq_3mvkeM Yoga nidra, which is derived from the tantras, is a powerful technique in which you learn to relax consciously. In yoga nidra, sleep is not regarded as relaxation. People feel that they are relaxing when they collapse in an easy chair with a cup of coffee, a drink or a cigarette, and read a newspaper or switch on the television. But this will never suffice as a scientific definition of relaxation. These are only sensory diversions. True relaxation is actually an experience far beyond all this. For absolute relaxation you must remain aware. This is yoga nidra, the state ...
Read More
Insight meditation is based on the word “Vipassana”, which means “insight.” It’s meditation that requires strict body and mind focus and produces dramatic results. It’s used to dissolve problems, clear the mind, and counter issues someone may have. Instead of concentrating on a single item, like breathing, you will maintain awareness of your surroundings during insight meditation and try to absorb the various distractions around you. Find the right place and time, then focus your energy to seek a truer, deeper meaning of life. Part-1: Preparing for Insight Meditation 1. Set aside a specific time. While insight meditation is about ...
Read More

Chapter-09: Mantra

Opening Mantra Opening: Om Sahana Vavatu Mantra for Sun Salutations Sun Salutations Mantra Meditation Journey Download PDF Day-1: Om The Cosmic Yes Day 2: Inner Peace Day 3: New Beginnings Day 4: I Am Love Day 5: Protection Day 6: From Darkness to Light Day 7: Liberation Day 8: Wholeness Day 9_ The Inner Guru Day 10: Abundance Day 11: Reverence Day 12: Perfecting Wisdom Day 13: Happiness Day 14: Buddha Nature Day 15: Healing Day 16: Medicine Buddha Day 17: Supreme Love Made Manifes Day 18: Compassion In Action Day 19: The Jewel In The Lotus Day 20: Tantra~Mantra ...
Read More

Chapter-10: Mudra

The Sanskrit word mudra is translated as 'gesture' or 'attitude' . Mudras can be described as psychic, emotional, devotional and aesthetic gestures or attitudes. Yogis have experienced mudras as attitudes of energy flow, intended to link individual pranic force with universal or cosmic force. The Kularnava Tantra traces the word mudra to the root mud, meaning 'delight' or 'pleasure', and dravay, the causal form of dru, which means 'to draw forth'. Mudra is also defined as a 'seal', 'short-cut' or 'circuit by-pass' . Mudras are a combination of subtle physical movements which alter mood, attitude and perception, and which deepen ...
Read More
Jnana Mudra (psychic gesture of knowledge) Assume a comfortable meditation posture. Fold the index fingers so that they touch the inside root of the thumbs. Straighten the other three fingers of each hand so that they are relaxed and slightly apart. Place the hands on the knees with the palms facing down. Relax the hands and arms. Chin Mudra (psychic gesture of consciousness) Chin mudra is performed in the same way as jnana mudra, except that the palms ofboth hands face upwards, with the backs of the hands resting on the knees. Relax the hands and arms. Sequence: One of ...
Read More
Assume a comfortable meditation posture with the head and spine straight. Place the palms of the hands together with the fingers and thumbs straight and pointing away from the body. Keeping the pads of the index fingers together, turn the little, ring and middle fingers inwards so that the backs of the fingers are touching. Interlock the little, ring and middle fingers. Bring the thumbs towards the body and join the pads of the fingers together to form the base of a yoni or womb shape. Benefits: The interlocking of the fingers in this practice creates a complete cross-connection of ...
Read More
Assume a comfortable meditation posture with the head and spine straight. Place the right hand on top of the left, so that the palms of both hands are facing upward. Both hands rest in the lap. Close the eyes and relax the whole body, keeping it motionless. Variation: When the left hand is placed on top of the right, the practice is called Bhairavi mudra. Bhairavi is the female counterpart of Bhairava. Note: The two hands represent ida and pingala no.dis, and the union of the individual with the supreme consciousness. Bhairava mudra is used in prano. mudra. It may ...
Read More
Sit in any comfortable meditation asana with the head and spine straight. Place the tips of the index fingers at the root of the thumbs, as in chin and jnana mudras, and join the tips of the middle and ring fingers to the tips of the thumbs. The little finger remains straight. Place the hands on the knees with the palms facing upward. Close the eyes and relax the whole body, keeping it motionless. Duration: This practice may be performed for up to 30 minutes. Awareness: Physical - on the breath in the chest area. Spiritual - on anahata chakra ...
Read More
Sit in any comfortable meditation asana. Keep the head and spine upright and straight, and place the hands on the knees in either chin or jnana mudra. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. Relax all the muscles of the face, including the forehead, the eyes and behind the eyes. Slowly open the eyes and look ahead at a fixed point, keeping the head and the whole body absolutely still. Next, look upward and inward, focusing the eyes at the eyebrow centre. The head should not move. When performed correctly, the curve of the eyebrows will form a V ...
Read More
Sit in any comfortable medi tation pose, preferably padmasana or siddha/siddha yoni asana, with the head and spine straight and the hands in chin or jnana mudra. Relax the whole body and close the eyes. Fold the tongue upward and backward, so that the lower surface lies in contact with the upper palate. Stretch the tip of the tongue backward as far as is comfortable. Do not strain. Perform ujjayi pranayama. Breathe slowly and deeply. Hold the tongue lock for as long as possible without straining. At first there may be some discomfort and ujjayi pranayama may irritate the throat, ...
Read More

Chapter-11: Bandha

Traditionally, bandhas were classified as part of mudras, and were handed down by word of mouth from guru to disciple. The Hatha Yoga Pradipika deals with bandhas and mudras together and the ancient tantric texts also make no distinction between the two. Bandhas are extensively incorporated in mudra as well as pranayama techniques. Their locking action, however, reveals them as a fundamentally important group of practices in their own right. The Sanskrit word bandha means to 'hold', 'tighten' or 'lock'. These definitions precisely describe the physical action involved in the bandha practices and their effect on the pranic body. The ...
Read More
Sit in padmasana or siddha/siddha yoni asana with the head and spine straight. The knees should be in firm contact with the floor. Those who cannot manage this may perform jalandhara bandha in a standing position. Place the palms of the hands on the knees. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. Inhale slowly and deeply, and retain the breath inside. While retaining the breath, bend the head forward and press the chin tightly against the chest. Straighten the arms and lock them firmly into position, pressing the knees down with the hands. Simultaneously, hunch the shoulders upward and ...
Read More
Technique 1: Moola Bandha (perineum contraction) Stage 1: Sit in siddha/siddha yoni asana so that pressure is applied to the perineal/vaginal region. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. Be aware of the natural breath for a short while. Then focus the awareness on the perineal/vaginal region. Contract this region by pulling up on the muscles of the pelvic floor and then relaxing them. Continue to briefly contract and relax the perineal/vaginal region as rhythmically and evenly as possible. Stage 2: Slowly contract this region and hold the contraction. Continue to breathe normally; do not hold the breath. Be ...
Read More
Technique 1: Preparatory practice: Standing abdominal contraction Stand erect with the feet about half a metre apart. Inhale deeply through the nostrils. Bend forward from the waist and exhale all the air through the mouth. Try to empty the lungs as much as possible. Keep the spine horizontal and bend the knees slightly. Place the palms of the hands on the thighs just above the knees, so that the knees are supporting the weight of the upper body. The fingers can point either downward or towards each other. Make sure the arms are straight. In this position there is an ...
Read More
Sit in siddha/siddha yoni asana or padmasana with the hands on the knees. The spine should be erect and the head straight. Close the eyes and relax the whole body. Breathe in slowly and deeply through the nose. Exhale forcefully and completely through the mouth. Retain the breath outside. Successively perform jalandhara, uddiyana and moola bandhas in this order. Hold the bandhas and the breath for as long as is comfortable without straining. Then release moola, uddiyana and jalandhara bandhas in this order. Inhale slowly when the head is upright. This is one round. Keep the eyes closed, relax the ...
Read More

Chapter-12: Practice Program

Yogavatar®️ Glow is a vigorous yoga practice focusing on stretching and strengthening while maintaining steadiness of the body and mind. The body movements can be slow and long hold, sometimes moves like the water flow. The breathing is deep and quality for a smooth energy flow. The main goal of this practice is to let your body and mind Glow! Yogavatar® Glow with iRyne TTC 20200808 Morning Practice 90min Yogavatar® Glow with iRyne TTC 20200809 Morning Practice 90min Yogavatar® Glow with iRyne TTC 20200815 Morning Practice 90min Yogavatar® Glow with iRyne TTC 20200816 Morning Practice 90min Yogavatar® Glow with iRyne ...
Read More
Yogavatar® Zen is a yoga practice for relaxing, repairing and rejuvenating both your body and mind. The practice will begin with gentle movements to release physical and mental tension, progressing into long hold resting poses. Variety of breathing and meditation techniques will be offered to deepen your Zen experience. Yogavatar® Zen with R2: The Preparatory Practice Yogavatar® Zen with R2: Spine mobility 75min Level-1 Yogavatar® Zen with R2: Hip Opener 60min Level-1 Yogavatar® Zen with R2: Shoulder Opener 60mins Level-1 Yogavatar® Zen with R2: Easing Menstrual Discomfort 60min Level-1 Yogavatar® Zen with R2: The Chakras 60mins Level-1 Yogavatar® Zen with ...
Read More

Chapter-13: Teaching Methodology

Teaching yoga is at once profoundly personal, predicated on sharing, and shaped by context. It is also inevitably surprising. We have no choice but to start from where we are and who we are, with whatever knowledge, skills, and experience we have in the moment. We also have little choice but to work with whomever shows up for class, teaching students whose conditions, intentions, learning styles, and needs are widely varied. On any given day, unanticipated events can make a class much different than what you might have envisioned. The changes that happen from class to class also have everything ...
Read More
The primary goal in teaching asanas is to enable students to perceive and understand more clearly what they are doing in developing a sustainable personal practice, whether in a class or independently. But there are many different ways of learning that require a varied approach to teaching. How people learn is closely tied to what educator Howard Gardner (1993) refers to as “qualities of multiple intelligence,” which vary considerably in any given class of yoga students. In yoga classes, where the learning objectives include conceptual, emotional, physical, and metaphysical elements, the full range of multiple intelligences are in play. At ...
Read More
5 Abilities of A Professional Yoga Teacher Able to PlanAble to DemonstrateAble to TeachAble to AssistAble to Inspire ...
Read More
Environment Setting Yoga mat arrangementProps and equipmentLight settingAir ventilation or aromaMusic or silenceSpaceSafety Class Sequence OpeningCleansingPreparatoryAsanaPranayamaPratyaharaClosing Class Type Class level: simple or complexStyle: Dynamic or staticPace: Slow or fast paceDuration of the classObjective ...
Read More
Technique Be a role model Body alignmentMovementRange of motionBreath Step by Step Demonstrate step by step: what, how, whereOffer optionsSafety is priority Position Demonstrate at the place where everyone can seeFlow with studentsGather around ...
Read More
Instruction Verbal and body languageEasy to understand and easy to followInitial setup cue: what, how, where, breath Follow-up cue: feel, benefit, deepen, motivation, objective of the classSilent and promote concentration Voice Quality ClearVolume & ContrastPitchSpeed CRC connectrecommendcommend ...
Read More
Observation moving aroundeye scanning Adjustment Giving appropriate physical touch, adjustment Safety Provide assistance in safe manner Principles of Yoga Adjustment Practice giving hands-on adjustment before giving adjustment.Stay grounded and attentive to your own stability and ease.Ask permission to touchGive verbal instruction before touchExplain what you going to adjustStay attuned to the student’s breath, stability, and ease.Be clear and specific in giving cue while adjustingAsk “is this OK?” while you adjustNever give strong adjustment distallyDo not apply pressure to vulnerable joints, organs,or injured areas.Ask students to come out of the pose if the fundamental misalignment.Breathe with the student and synchronise your ...
Read More
The Simplest Ways To Inspire People And Change Their Life Has anyone ever inspired you to change your life in a significant way that made you healthier, happier, or more fulfilled? If so, you understand the difference that positive inspiration can make in a person’s life. Inspiration is powerful, but it isn’t easy. Would you like to return the favor by making a positive difference in the life of your friends, family, or co-workers? If you want to be a positive influence capable of inspiring your loved ones to become better versions of themselves, please consider these 20 ways to ...
Read More
Being a yoga teacher comes with a lot of responsibility, apart from just teaching the poses. Becoming a teacher is a life-transforming and astounding resolution that enables you to bestow the treasure of the ancient art of yoga to others. “Yoga Teacher” is someone who is liable for spreading yogic wisdom, and to become a certified yoga instructor, participating in a Yoga Teacher Training if the first step. YTT, as it’s often called is designed to provide the tools necessary to teach others about the ancient practice of yoga, teach you to provide major life-lessons to your students, and trains ...
Read More
If you are a yoga teacher, you are likely dedicated to continuously learning new information about asana and anatomy in order to keep things fresh for your students. However, simply saying what you already know in a new way—perhaps retooling your language according to the ten wise principles (yamas and niyamas)—can also revitalize your students' experience of yoga. And, by applying the yamas and niyamas to your diction, you will also make your speech itself yet another space in which to practice yoga. Here are some suggestions to consider. YAMAS Ahimsa (Non-Harming): Do use non-harming language. Non-harming is probably at ...
Read More

Chapter-14: Professional Development

The Yogavatar® Teacher Training Course is registered with Yoga Alliance at the 200-hour level. If your goal is to receive your 200-hour certification, you must comply with Yoga Alliance’s standards, which include passing theory and practical exam before graduation. Upon completion of this yoga teacher training, students are eligible to register with Yoga Alliance as Registered Yoga Teachers (RYT®). Registration with Yoga Alliance provides a globally recognized credential. www.yogaalliance.org RYS 200 CORE CURRICULUM ...
Read More
Last Updated: February 27, 2020 As Yoga Alliance enhances the standards underlying its Registered Yoga School (RYS™) credentials, many RYTs are curious as to what these changes mean for them. There's good news! If you are a current RYT, you are still an RYT. We are proud to have you as a Yoga Alliance member. You do not need to take and graduate from another RYS 200 program.If you are not a current RYT, as long as your yoga school was a current RYS 200 at the time you graduated, you are still eligible to join Yoga Alliance as an ...
Read More
Yoga Alliance’s Code of Conduct is a declaration of acceptable ethical and professional behavior to which all registrants agree with respect to conducting the teaching and/or business of yoga. It is not intended to supersede the ethics of any school or tradition but is intended to be a basis for yoga principles. Yoga Alliance members—Registered Yoga Teachers (RYTs), Continuing Education Providers (YACEPs), or representatives of Registered Yoga Schools (RYSs)—agree to uphold the following ethical principles: Conduct themselves in a professional and conscientious manner. This includes, but is not limited to, ensuring that they live up to any commitments they make ...
Read More
One of the biggest areas yoga teachers can improve their business (and life) is by learning how to better market themselves. However, “marketing ourselves” is also where most of us get stuck. Putting ourselves out there can be hard. Self-promotion is tricky. While on one hand we want our offering to be well-known, on the other hand we don’t want to sound sales-y or gimmicky. With a deep understanding of marketing, you can turn your yoga career from barely surviving to thriving! This article is all about the basics of marketing and how it can accelerate your yoga business. Get ...
Read More
Recently finished your YTT course and are ready to start teaching in a studio? Looking for another teaching gig? Hoping to find a yoga teaching job in another country? …then this one is for you! So how do you secure a regular teaching position at a yoga studio? With a killer yoga teacher resume (aka your yoga CV)! Handing a studio owner your professional resume can set you miles apart from other teachers at your yoga audition. I can speak from experience – I am a graphic designer and yoga teacher. I’ve had several studio owners comment and ask about ...
Read More
As part of a social media contest in 2014, we asked Registered Yoga Teachers (RYT®s) to fill out the bio section of their online profile. As the first assignment in the five-week contest, we asked you to simply, “tell your story.” With this simple instruction, over 100 of you responded in astoundingly creative, colorful and personal ways. This was the first time our staff had the chance to get to know you, as the bio is one of many new features of our online profiles. While reading your bios, we felt inspired that we have the opportunity to work with ...
Read More

Chapter-15: Practicum

10-minute teaching on 15th December 2020 20201216 Glow Shirley 20201226 Glow Stephy 20201216 Zen Dorothy 20201216 Zen Elisse 20201217 Glow Chelsea 20201217 Glow Elisse 20201217 Glow Dorothy 20201217 Glow Mei Foong 20201217 Zen Shirley 20201217 Zen Stephy 20201218 Zen Chelsea 20201218 Zen Mei Foong ...
Read More